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WORLD AIDS DAY 2011 - ADVOCACY FOR ZERO NEW HIV INFECTION VIA AVAILABILITY OF SAFE BLOOD

A safe and adequate supply of blood for transfusion is an essential component of any health system. For many countries, however, blood is either not available in the required quantities or is not safe enough for transfusion. The demand for blood is always increasing in the world due to the highly sophisticated health systems as well as longer post-transfusion life expectancy. The demand profile in Africa and indeed the developing world is different, but these nations are no less dependent on safe supplies.

Blood safety, however, remains a challenge to many countries in sub-Saharan Africa due to unstable economies, civil strife, natural and manmade disasters, and failure to translate government commitment to practical interventions that would lead to further improvement. Moreover, the African Region does not only have 10% of the world’s disease burden (World Health Report) but also the highest rates of infectious diseases transmissible through blood transfusion, high HIV prevalence (about 60% of the world’s total prevalence and 60% of the total transmissions in 2006). It has a prevalence of more than 8% of the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) which is a marker of infective carrier state10 and a prevalence of HCV as high as 2.5% to 10% in some areas.

Blood safety can broadly be defined as adequate and timely provision of safe blood and blood products to all in need of transfusion as part of their treatment. The product must be of the right efficacy and adequate quantity to correct the homeostatic defect in the normal physiology of the blood for the patient; the blood must be free of infections transmissible by blood transfusion.

Blood transfusion is a life-saving intervention that has an essential role in patient management within health care systems. All Member States of the World Health Organization (WHO) endorsed World Health Assembly resolutions WHA28.72 (1) in 1975 and WHA58.13 (2) in 2005. These commit them to the provision of adequate supplies of safe blood and blood products that are accessible to all patients who require transfusion either to save their lives or promote their continuing or improving health. It is the responsibility of governments to assure a safe and sufficient supply of blood and blood products for all patients requiring transfusion.
WHO recommends an integrated strategy for the provision of safe blood and blood products and safe, efficacious blood transfusion. Crucial among such strategy is Collection of blood from voluntary non-remunerated blood donors at low risk of infections that can be transmitted through blood and blood products, the phasing out of family/replacement donation and the elimination of paid donation.

Blood Donors and Blood Screening
Screening of donated blood for TTIs represents one element of strategies for blood safety and availability. However, the first line of defense in providing a safe blood supply and minimizing the risk of transfusion-transmitted infection is to collect blood from well-selected, voluntary non-remunerated blood donors from low-risk populations, particularly those who donate regularly. The prevalence of TTIs in voluntary non-remunerated blood donors is generally much lower than among family/replacement and paid donors.

The two crucial issues related to blood transfusion in the developing world, particularly Africa, are blood shortages and unsafe blood, which all too frequently lead to serious health consequences such as death from postpartum hemorrhage or the transmission of life-threatening infections such as HIV and hepatitis. These deaths and serious side effects are preventable through actions to improve blood safety and availability.

Unsafe blood transfusions have contributed to the enormous burden of HIV infections in sub-
Saharan Africa and still continue to add to this burden. The risk of HIV infection through unsafe blood and blood products is exceptionally high (95–100%) compared to other common routes of HIV exposure: for example, 11–32% for mother-to-child transmission and 0.1%–10% for sexual contact. Sub-Saharan Africa has a particularly high level of transfusion-associated HIV compared with other regions due to a higher risk of infected blood being transfused. These results from a combination of factors: high rates of transfusion in some groups of patients (particularly women and children), a higher incidence and prevalence of HIV infection, dependence on unsafe blood donors and inadequate testing of blood for HIV in some countries. Women and children account for a disproportionate number of HIV infections through unsafe blood because they are the main groups of patients receiving blood transfusion.

This is as a result of the following interconnectedness of availability of safe blood to addressing of the various burgeoning health challenges facing the African state.

Severe anemia occurs more frequently in Africa than in most other parts of the world. This results from the high number of patients with pregnancy-related complications, malaria, worm infestations, malnutrition and sickle cell disease. Blood transfusion is frequently central to the management of life-threatening anemia, but blood shortages are experienced throughout Africa. These have a particular impact on women and children. Africa has the highest maternal mortality in the world; most of which are attributable to haemorrhage. Globally, more than half a million women die each year as a result of complications of pregnancy and childbirth2. Of the 20 countries with the highest maternal death rates, 19 are in sub-Saharan Africa where the risk of maternal death is 1 in 16, compared with 1 in 2800 in rich countries. The most common cause of maternal death is severe bleeding, which can kill even a healthy woman within two hours, if unattended; in Africa, severe bleeding during delivery or after childbirth contributes to up to 44% of maternal deaths3. Many of these deaths could be prevented through access to safe blood.

Children are also particularly vulnerable to shortages of blood in Africa because of their high requirement for transfusion arising from severe life-threatening anemia caused by malaria or malnutrition. Falciparum malaria causes more than 1 million deaths each year worldwide4. It also contributes indirectly to many additional deaths, mainly in young children, through synergy with other infections and illnesses. Around 60% of the cases of clinical malaria and over 80% of malarial deaths occur in sub-Saharan Africa where 9 out of 10 malarial deaths occur in children under five years of age. Mortality due to severe malarial anaemia is considerable in the Region. Studies report that up to 50% of transfusions given to children are related to malaria induced anemia.

Call to Action
The good news is that the transmission of HIV through unsafe blood transfusion is preventable- and is, in fact, the only approach to HIV prevention that is almost 100% effective. Blood safety is therefore one of the most cost-effective strategies for reducing the burden of HIV infection in Africa.

Serious blood shortages contributes to an increased risk of HIV and hepatitis because an inadequate stock of blood forces a reliance on unsafe family or paid donors and increased pressure to issue blood without testing as mentioned above. It is important that sub-Saharan countries achieve 100 per cent voluntary unpaid blood donation, which is the cornerstone of a safe blood supply, if we are to achieve zero tolerance new HIV infection.

The strategy advocated by WHO to achieve effective, cost-efficient and safe national blood supply systems has three main components, which are:
• Voluntary unpaid blood donation: the first line of defense is the donation of blood only by regular, voluntary unpaid blood donors from low-risk populations, who are the safest possible blood donors, and a careful assessment of their suitability to donate blood.
• Universal testing of donated blood: the second line of defense is the screening of all donated blood in accordance with quality requirements for, at minimum, HIV, hepatitis B, hepatitis C and syphilis.
Reducing unnecessary transfusions: the third line of defense is the appropriate use of transfusion only when medically indicated for patient survival and wellbeing, minimizing the loss of blood during surgery, and the use of suitable alternative treatment.

The impact of blood safety measures is demonstrated by the virtual elimination of transfusion transmitted infections in the United States (estimated risk of HIV infection of 1 in 1,800,000 per blood unit). Importantly, improved blood donor selection techniques contributed to a dramatic reduction in the risk of transmission of infection, even before specific laboratory screening tests were available.

The aforementioned facts among others, show the reason we need to campaign for Voluntary Non Remunerated Blood Donation (VNRBD) from low risk population of voluntary donors as recommended by the apex world health organization, WHO.

Blood Drive Initiative (BDI) an organization with the desire to provide safe and sustainable blood supply to meet the rising need for blood and blood products in the country have noticed that “the average, educated, healthy and well- to-do’’ citizen of this country whose life style is compatible with the criteria for a healthy donor do not donate blood unless compelled by circumstances this shouldn’t be the attitude of citizenry to blood donation but should be altruistic.

Towards this BDI , a youth-based organization in the front gear of canvassing for 100% voluntary non remunerative blood donation in Nigeria uses this opportunity of World AIDS Day 2011 to advocate for all and sundry to join the force towards attainment of 100% Voluntary Non Remunerated Blood Donation (VNRBD).

Join BDI and other organizations in this humanitarian efforts to ensure that Nigeria achieve 100% voluntary non remunerated regular blood donation by giving what science has not been able to create nor can money buy.

Final Word
Considering the high effectiveness of HIV prevention through safe blood, there should be zero tolerance of any transmission of HIV and other infections within the health care system, particularly by ensuring availability of safe blood, which starts with attainment of 100% Voluntary Non Remunerated Blood Donation (VNRBD).


Adeluwoye Adekunle Oluwatosin
Executive Director, Operations
Blood Drive Initiative (BDI)
Ibadan, Nigeria.
(T): +234(0)8035434655, +234(0)7040787897
(E): princekunlzy@gmail.com
(B): http://www.bdinitiative.blogspot.com

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BLOOD DRIVE INITIATIVE (BDI), founded in June 2005 in the University College Hospital Ibadan, is a youth-led non-governmental organization with a desire to provide safe and sustainable blood supply to meet the rising need for blood and blood products amidst of daunting challenges facing availability of ‘Safe Blood’ in Nigeria. A fast growing network of youth advocates and volunteer blood donors, BDI’s main shove is to be the change in the Blood Transfusion Service sector of the healthcare system by bridging the chasm that exists between need and opportunity via encouraging the right kind of people to adopt a lifestyle of voluntary blood donation.
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Life is better lived, when shared in love. Give blood. Share life!

A REPORT ON THE 4TH DRIVE ORGANISED IN AAU DETACHMENT

Glory be to God for a successful drive. The drive which was held on the 22nd of June generated a total number of one hundred and seventy-seven (177) units of blood.
The drive was sponsored the N.B.T.S. south- south zone (Benin). A budget proposal of #36000 was sent by the B.D.I. executives to N.B.T.S. and this request was favourably  granted.
Prior to the drive, there was a courtesy visit on the 20th of June by the N.B.T.S.  Staffs led by Mr. Tayo Onafowokan to the principal offices in the college of medicine Ambrose Alli University, Ekpoma which was the venue of the blood donation exercise.  Special packages were given to these officers.
There was also a visit to the patroness Prof. Mrs.  Ekundayo by  the coordinator, erstwhile coordinator and Mr. Tayo Onafowokan of N.B.T.S. She donated a sum of #3000 for the drive.
The drive was covered by National Television Authority (NTA) Iruekpen crew and was later broadcasted on the local news session.
CHALLENGES
A total number of two hundred and thirty intending donors were present for drive , but due  to some of the challenges faced, about fifty donors couldn't  donate, although some were deferred because they were not fit. Some of the challenges faced include;
1.       1.Late arrival by the N.B.T.S. team
2.       2.Inadequate bleeding  beds
3.       3.Lack of dedication by some members
    Osuloye Oluwaseun
    Coordinator
    Coordintor

A REPORT ON THE 4TH DRIVE ORGANISED IN AAU DETACHMENT

Glory be to God for a successful drive. The drive which was held on the 22nd of June generated a total number of one hundred and seventy-seven (177) units of blood.
The drive was sponsored the N.B.T.S. south- south zone (Benin). A budget proposal of #36000 was sent by the B.D.I. executives to N.B.T.S. and this request was favourably  granted.
Prior to the drive, there was a courtesy visit on the 20th of June by the N.B.T.S.  Staffs led by Mr. Tayo Onafowokan to the principal offices in the college of medicine Ambrose Alli University, Ekpoma which was the venue of the blood donation exercise.  Special packages were given to these officers.
There was also a visit to the patroness Prof. Mrs.  Ekundayo by  the coordinator, erstwhile coordinator and Mr. Tayo Onafowokan of N.B.T.S. She donated a sum of #3000 for the drive.
The drive was covered by National Television Authority (NTA) Iruekpen crew and was later broadcasted on the local news session.
CHALLENGES
A total number of two hundred and thirty intending donors were present for drive , but due  to some of the challenges faced, about fifty donors couldn't  donate, although some were deferred because they were not fit. Some of the challenges faced include;
1.       1. Late arrival by the N.B.T.S. team
2.       2. Inadequate bleeding  beds
3.       3. Lack of dedication by some members.

Tomorrow is the D-day

Tomorrow is the d-day. Hope to see you all at Ibadan (BDI's national
headquarter), venue of the Intellectual discourse to commemorate WBDD
2011 as well as Presentation/Launching of the our foremost advocacy
book - "Crimson Dynamics - Sustainable Blood Supply in Nigeria - The
Inside Out" written by Paul Adepoju for Blood Drive Initiative. The
topic of discourse is 'Availability of Safe Blood: Perspectives of
Teaching Hospital and NBTS'. Speakers are: Dr. (Mrs) Ifeoma Ogbue,
National Coordinator, NBTS and Mr. Idris Saliu, Safe Blood For Africa
Foundation, Abuja.
--
Adeluwoye Adekunle Oluwatosin
Executive Director, Operations
Blood Drive Initiative (BDI)
Ibadan, Nigeria.
(T): +234(0)8035434655, +234(0)7040787897
(E): princekunlzy@gmail.com
(B): http://www.bdinitiative.blogspot.com

----------------------------------------------------------------------
BLOOD DRIVE INITIATIVE (BDI), founded in June 2005 in the University
College Hospital Ibadan, is a youth-led non-governmental organization
with a desire to provide safe and sustainable blood supply to meet the
rising need for blood and blood products amidst of daunting challenges
facing availability of 'Safe Blood' in Nigeria. A fast growing network
of youth advocates and volunteer blood donors, BDI's main shove is to
be the change in the Blood Transfusion Service sector of the
healthcare system by bridging the chasm that exists between need and
opportunity via encouraging the right kind of people to adopt a
lifestyle of voluntary blood donation.
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Life is better lived, when shared in love. Give blood. Share life!

Open letter to MTN

---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: BLOOD DRIVE INITIATIVE <bdinitiative@gmail.com>
Date: Thu, 16 Jun 2011 00:31:42 +0100
Subject: Open letter to MTN
To: ladyjennies@yahoo.com, adepojupaul@gmail.com, adekoga@yahoo.com,
princekunlzy@gmail.com, comrado174@yahoo.com,
ifeoluwa.adeyemi@yahoo.com, healthnews@channelstv.com,
goodpeopleguardian@gmail.com, unique_inhim@yahoo.com

To:
The Management Board and staff of MTN Nigeria and MTN Foundation
Dear All,
THANK YOU
I write on behalf of all the countless number of Nigerians whose lives
have been saved by safe blood transfusion and on behalf of 'faceless'
but highly esteemed voluntary blood donors whose priceless gift of
blood has redeemed many lives, to say 'Thank you' to MTN for being the
very first corporate body to acknoledge the existence of and to
commemorate/celebrate the World Blood Donorsl Day. This act lends
great credence to the fact that MTN is a socially responsive
organization.

Though MTN has no direct business relations with blood and blood
donation, they have done this in cognizance of the untold number lives
that have been saved, are being saved and will be saved by safe blood.

We thank them for this kind gesture and urge other corporate bodies
and institutions to awaken to their responsibility.

Availability of safe blood ties directly with the attainment of MDGs
4, 5, and 6. We can achieve these goals only if we team up. As it is
said Together Everybody Achieves More.

Yours,
Lala Oluwatobi K
Executive Director, Admin
Blood Drive Initiative

BDI is a registered incorporated trust under Corporate Affairs
Commission, Nigeria. It is a member of the Global Health Council and
an Associate Member of the International Federation of Blood Donor
Organizations

--
Life makes sense when there is someone to share it with.

--
Life makes sense when there is someone to share it with.

You all are cherished!

Special thanks too to all Blood Drive Initiative members committed to
the cause of ensuring the availability of safe blood in our dear
nation Nigeria. Sincerely, every of the success is due you, as it is a
collective one, while the glory is due to God only. You all are
Cherished!
--
Adeluwoye Adekunle Oluwatosin
Executive Director, Operations
Blood Drive Initiative (BDI)
Ibadan, Nigeria.
(T): +234(0)8035434655, +234(0)7040787897
(E): princekunlzy@gmail.com
(B): http://www.bdinitiative.blogspot.com

----------------------------------------------------------------------
BLOOD DRIVE INITIATIVE (BDI), founded in June 2005 in the University
College Hospital Ibadan, is a youth-led non-governmental organization
with a desire to provide safe and sustainable blood supply to meet the
rising need for blood and blood products amidst of daunting challenges
facing availability of 'Safe Blood' in Nigeria. A fast growing network
of youth advocates and volunteer blood donors, BDI's main shove is to
be the change in the Blood Transfusion Service sector of the
healthcare system by bridging the chasm that exists between need and
opportunity via encouraging the right kind of people to adopt a
lifestyle of voluntary blood donation.
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Life is better lived, when shared in love. Give blood. Share life!

You are all CELEBRITIES!

I must say a BIG thank you to all life savers - all Voluntary
Non-Remunerative Blood Donors (VNRBD) who have given and will still
give the priceless gift of safe blood to people they never knew or
would likely meet. You are all CELEBRITIES. Love you all!
--
Adeluwoye Adekunle Oluwatosin
Executive Director, Operations
Blood Drive Initiative (BDI)
Ibadan, Nigeria.
(T): +234(0)8035434655, +234(0)7040787897
(E): princekunlzy@gmail.com
(B): http://www.bdinitiative.blogspot.com

----------------------------------------------------------------------
BLOOD DRIVE INITIATIVE (BDI), founded in June 2005 in the University
College Hospital Ibadan, is a youth-led non-governmental organization
with a desire to provide safe and sustainable blood supply to meet the
rising need for blood and blood products amidst of daunting challenges
facing availability of 'Safe Blood' in Nigeria. A fast growing network
of youth advocates and volunteer blood donors, BDI's main shove is to
be the change in the Blood Transfusion Service sector of the
healthcare system by bridging the chasm that exists between need and
opportunity via encouraging the right kind of people to adopt a
lifestyle of voluntary blood donation.
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Life is better lived, when shared in love. Give blood. Share life!

BDI on Channels TV

I must start by commending the work of the duo of BDI's Zonal Operations 2 director, Mr Adeniji Adekoga and ED_Ops Mr Adekunle Adeluwoye, whose initiative, proactiveness and tenaciousness paved the way for the interview. My first call was at Channels office at ikorodu road in Maryland, Lagos where i was received, firstly, by BDI's care director Miss Ifeoluwa Adeyemi and then by the staff of Channels TV. We went on from their to Channels' TV permanent site at Isheri, Lagos where the interview was conducted and recorded. The interview is scheduled to be aired today by 8:30pm on the Channels network. Please stay tuned!

THE NEED TO SAVE A LIFE

The World Health Assembly set aside June 14th of every year to celebrate and thank those who donate blood for altruistic reasons (voluntary unpaid blood donors). The June date was selected as it is the anniversary of the birth of Karl Landsteiner, the Nobel Prize winner who discovered the ABO blood group system in 1907, which has made blood transfusions a key part of modern medicine since 1930.

 

The aim of designating a special day each year to celebrate the role of these blood donors in health care around the world is to motivate more individuals to become regular voluntary unpaid blood donors; create wider awareness of the vital role of blood transfusion in saving lives and improving the health of millions of people each year; to recognize regular voluntary unpaid donors as public health role models; and to promote a healthy life style among the populace to encourage them to donate blood regularly.

 

The theme for this year World Blood Donor Day is, "More blood, More life." This theme reinforces the vital role of blood transfusion in saving lives and urgent need for more people all over the world to become lifesavers by volunteering to donate blood regularly.

 

The need for safe and secured supplies of blood and blood products is universal. Worldwide, at least 90 million units of blood are donated each year to save lives and improve health. However, demand for blood for transfusion continues to increase, and many countries cannot meet the existing needs. In many regions, this means inadequate supplies to replace blood lost in childbirth (a major cause of maternal deaths) and to treat anaemia that threatens the lives of children who have malaria or are undernourished. Everywhere, blood and blood products are needed by a growing number of people: those injured in road traffic accidents, those with congenital blood disorders and for routine emergency surgery and life-saving treatment.

 

Today, 62 countries have blood transfusion services based entirely on voluntary blood donation, compared to 39 in 2002 and 57 in 2007. Belarus, the Islamic Republic of Iran, Malaysia, Kenya (Africa) and Zambia (Africa) are the latest to join this list. Nigeria is yet to achieve this status. Other African countries that have achieved this before are South Africa, Zimbabwe and others.

 

The need to achieve 100% voluntary blood donation is very crucial especially in our nation Nigeria as facts show that;

  • More than half a million women die each year during pregnancy, childbirth or in the postpartum period – Nigeria has the highest incidence of 1 in every 13 maternal deaths recorded globally
  • One out of every 3 women who die during pregnancy or childbirth is as a result of severe bleeding.
  • One out of every 5 children dies before their 5th birthday mainly due to unavailability of safe blood when needed.
  • In sub-Saharan Africa, fewer than 3 million units of blood are collected each year for a population of more than 700 million people.
  • In the case of accidents and other disasters, 35% of pre-hospital deaths and over 40% of deaths within 24 hours is due to haemorrhage (profuse blood loss). 9 out of every 10 people who need blood may not get safe blood.
  • The prevalence of HIV, hepatitis viruses and other blood-borne infections in paid and family replacement donors common in our society continues to make the availability of safe blood for patients in need, a far-fetched goal.

 

The aforementioned facts among others, shows why we need to campaign for Voluntary Non Remunerated Blood Donation (VNRBD) from low risk population of voluntary donors as recommended by the apex world health organization (WHO). Safe Blood Donors (i.e. VNRBD) therefore, are the cornerstone of a safe and adequate supply of blood and blood products, which will avert the trend of these facts.

 

Overall, the benefits of a regular, voluntary blood donation are:

Donor 

  • Provides health education and encourages maintenance of healthy lifestyles
  • Provides regular health checks
  • Increases self-esteem
  • Develops role models and donor motivators
  • Earns recognition from the community
  • Provides social engagement and a sense of belonging.

 

Blood Service

  • Enables provision of a sustainable, quality and accessible blood supply –

matching supply and demand

  • Potentially reduces rates of transfusion-transmitted infections
  • Forges partnerships with community
  • Enhances public confidence regarding blood safety and availability
  • Facilitates effective planning and budget management
  • Contributes to cost efficiencies – donor retention vs new donor recruitment and

inventory management

  • Reduces administrative tasks associated with family replacement systems.

      Patient

  • Equitable access to safe blood, during emergency situations and disasters.
  • Improves community health and health outcomes.
  • Reduced risk of immunological complications and adverse reactions.
  • Creates a sense of being 'cared for' by others.
  • Less pressure on family/patient to find donors.
  • Motivates a spirit of generosity, providing possibilities for reciprocal volunteering

in the future.

      Community

  • Ensures availability of blood, during emergencies and disasters.
  • Promotes healthy lifestyles.
  • Creates a sense of community spirit and pride.
  • Encourages volunteerism and community participation.
  • Encourages community partnerships and networks
  • Increased community pride/self esteem.
  • Improved quality of life.

 


Blood drive initiative (BDI) an organization with the desire to provide safe and sustainable blood supply to meet the rising need for blood and blood products in the country have noted that "the average, educated, healthy and well- to-do'' citizen of this country whose life style is compatible with the criteria for a healthy donor do not donate blood unless compelled by circumstances this shouldn't be the attitude of citizenry to blood donation but should be altruistic.

 

Towards this BDI , a youth-based organization is in the front gear of canvassing for 100% voluntary non remunerative blood donation in Nigeria and is currently operating from University and community based detachment such as AAU, LAUTECH (Oshogbo and Ogbomosho), UNIILORIN, EBSU ,UI,UNAAB, UNICAL ,UNIILAG , FEDPOLY EDE.

Join BDI and other organizations in this humanitarian efforts to ensure that Nigeria achieve 100% voluntary non remunerated regular blood donation by giving those in need of blood another chance at life.

Adekoga Adeniji ,N.
DIRECTOR OF ZONAL OPERATIONS-2
BLOOD DRIVE INITIATIVE.

08033949820

www.bdinitiative.blogspot.com

www.bdi.org.ng

www.adekoga.blogspot.com

 

 

REFERENCES

http://wbdd.org/fileadmin/Fil_Arkiv/PDF-diverse/WBDD-booklet.pdf

 

http://wbdd.org/fileadmin/2011/WBDD_2011_English.pdf

 

http://www.fiods.org

 

www.bdinitiative.blogspot.com

 

www.who.int/bloodsafety

 

http://www.who.int/worldblooddonorday/media/Global_Blood_Safety_and_Availability_Key_facts_figures_2010.pdf

 

Prof. A.H Fagbami, Chairman BDI Board of Trustees at the Exhibition Opening

Prof. A.H Fagbami, Chairman BDI Board of Trustees at the Exhibition Opening
Prof. A.H Fagbami, Chairman BDI Board of Trustees at the Exhibition Opening

REV. DELE SOTONWA DONATING BLOOD

REV. DELE SOTONWA DONATING BLOOD

Saving lives is the job of all

Saving lives is the job of all

Donate to support BDI on Global Giving; Give 2500Nigerians a chance at life via Safeblood

Donors' party

Donors' party

Ibadan Exhibition

Ibadan Exhibition

NBTS HQ

NBTS HQ
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